Airbnb in Turin

Airbnb in Turin

Turin sits in the shadow of the Aosta Alps in the north-western corner of Italy. And if that sounds like a pretty position, just wait until you see the gorgeous boulevards and stately Art Nouveau architecture of the city itself. Famed across the planet as the home of the revered Shroud of Turin (a holy relic that’s almost never on display, sadly) and that indelibly Italiano car, the Fiat, Turin mingles creativity with passion, great food with fantastic art and culture. The mighty spire of the Mole Antonelliana – once a synagogue, now a film museum – is what you’re likely to see first, but there’s a whole hodgepodge of neighbourhoods to explore all around it.

Airbnb in Turin promises all sorts of accommodation options. It’s now a fine alternative to the classic hotel, especially if you’re seeking self-catering and extra square metreage during your stay in the capital of the beautiful Piedmont region. This guide has all the info you need to kick start that search, starting with an in-depth area run-through and ending with a curated selection of some of the best Airbnb rentals across town.

In this Airbnb guide to Turin:

Is Airbnb legal in Turin?

It most certainly is. There are currently no local or federal government restrictions related to using or hosting via Airbnb in Turin or Italy as a whole. Feel free to click over to the site and start sifting through the thousands of flats and townhouses that are on offer in the regional capital. Booking is super simple, because everything can be done online without hassle. You might find that a few extra fees – like a local Turin tourist tax – are payable on arrival. What’s more, you’ll usually be asked to provide an ID or passport when you come to check in.

Where should I stay in Turin Airbnb?

Turin’s Centro (1) is the beating hub of city life. It’s a district that clutches the Po River before spilling westwards into the stylish and sleepless Quadrilatero Romano (2) (one for the nightlife seekers). To the south, closer to the train station, boho San Salvario (3) rears its head with cafés and jazz bars, while Aurora (4) offers Italian farmer’s markets to the north. Across the river and up in the hills, you can also seek out Borgo Po (5), where wooded peaks and Airbnbs with big gardens are the norm.

Centro
Royal Palace of Turin © Tara Van Der Linden Photo / Shutterstock.com

Centro

Pros
  • Perfect for sightseeing
  • Loads of cultural attractions
  • Lots of shopping
Cons
  • Very busy
  • Perhaps the most expensive area of town

Centro officially refers to the entire heart of Turin, but locals usually use it to talk about the bustling retail quarters between the Piazza Solferino and the River Po. The district is home to most of the postcard sights of the city, including that soaring needle spire of the Mole Antonelliana and the handsome Royal Palace of Turin. So, culture vultures certainly won’t get bored if they bag an Airbnb in these parts, but neither will foodies and shoppers – they can hit the endless cafés, kitchens, and boutiques of Via Principe Amedeo to keep themselves busy.

San Salvario
Porta Nuova Station © Takashi Images / Shutterstock.com

San Salvario

Pros
  • Best for nightlife
  • Local vibes
  • Affordable places to eat
Cons
  • Noisy after dark
  • Not very family friendly

San Salvario is now the stomping ground for Turin’s university students and resident bohemian crowd. Wedged between the Po River and the tracks of Porta Nuova Station, it’s a part of the downtown that’s gritty and jazzy and downright cool. On weekends, live music venues burst into action and crowds of Aperitivo aficionados take to the sidewalk bars. You’ll hear chatter and clinking wines all down Via Sant’Anselmo, and taste everything from Caribbean seafood to French crepes between the piazzas.

Aurora

Aurora

Pros
  • Feel like a local
  • Best markets in the city
  • Some quieter areas
Cons
  • Large area that’s not easy to walk around
  • The north side can be a little soulless

Aurora is known all over Turin as the home of the Porta Palazzo farmer’s market. Delve in and you’ll find sellers touting everything from fresh-caught Mediterranean fish (the sea’s not too far from Turin, you know) to crunchy Italian breads and pastries. Beyond the bazaar, Aurora beckons with repurposed buildings like the Cortile del Maglio – once an arms depot, now an art gallery – and sprawling weekend flea markets. There are also some quieter areas where you can escape into Airbnbs that have that authentic, lived-in Torino feel.

Quadrilatero Romano
Narrov streets Quadrilatero Romano © Marco Fine / Shutterstock.com

Quadrilatero Romano

Pros
  • Very multicultural
  • Great dining from all over the world
  • Vibrant nightlife
  • Unusual museums
Cons
  • Loud after dark
  • Not great access for cars – darn narrow streets!
  • Not typically Italian

Multicultural and pulsing with energy, the fantastic Quadrilatero Romano is a neighborhood of spice-scented curry houses, Arabic mezze joints, shisha bars and little Italian espresso holes-in-the-wall. The narrow alleys and streets run in a grid from the west of the Centro area (which is still within walking distance), offering a heady maze of blocks that can often seem more Asia than Europe. Hotspots in the area include the buzzy dining drag of Via Piave and the enthralling collection rooms at the Museum of Oriental Art – gold Buddha statues, anyone?

Borgo Po

Borgo Po

Pros
  • Quiet and peaceful
  • Very green
  • Rentals often come with gardens
Cons
  • Far away from the centre
  • Not very many Airbnbs

Look at the Borgo Po as the Beverly Hills of Turin. Chic and sleek, it lifts above the city centre on the Superga Hill that rises to the south-east. The gifts of getting away from it all are pockets of pine forest and plenty of greenery, but also some of the most luxury Airbnbs around – think grand apartments with sprawling gardens and views over to the Alps. You might not be close to the major sights and the nightlife areas, but you will have walking paths and palaces on the doorstep, not to mention easy access to the Po Valley and the mountains.

Best Airbnbs in Turin

Best Airbnb apartment in Turin

Little Suite Via Po

Little Suite Via Po

Cute, compact, but with just about everything you could need for a comfy stay in the heart of Turin, this lovely little suite offers a bright and breezy living area come kitchen on the fringes of Centro. The bedroom is separate for a little extra quietude and privacy. The cooking area is simplicity defined, offering a clean-look hob and Nespresso coffee machine.

Best Airbnb house in Turin

Villa Giustina Pino

Villa Giustina Pino

Whisk yourself away to the grassy reaches of the Borgo Po hills with a stint in this modern villa. It’s about 20 minutes by car from the markets of Porta Palazzo, but the surroundings are quiet and relaxed. You also get the bonus of your very own garden, patio seating areas, and spacious bedrooms. Hosts will accept groups with pets, but you’ll need to ask ahead.

Best Airbnb for families in Turin

A Due Passi Da Tutto

A Due Passi Da Tutto

A mix of doubles and twins sets up this six-person flat perfectly for the traveling family. Interiors include hardwood floors and simple design that keeps things easy on the eye but practical. There’s a large dining area – for sharing all those takeaway pizzas – and a good-sized lounge to boot. Location wise, you’re near both the Centro sights and the train station for when you want to escape to the rest of Italia.

Best Airbnb for large groups in Turin

Villa Cappuccino

Villa Cappuccino

Channel a little of Turin’s regal history by choosing to stay in this grand mansion house over on the city side of the Borgo Po. You’ll be close to both the green hills and the riverside neighbourhoods, but also get five bedrooms that come with space enough for 16 guests. Interiors are done out with elegant touches of classical furniture, but the piece de resistance has to be the series of patios and al fresco spaces where you can sit and watch urban life roll by.

Best Airbnb for luxury stays in Turin

Prestigious Historical Apartment in the Heart of Turin

Prestigious Historical Apartment in the Heart of Turin

Soaring ceilings with original beams loom over a piano and centuries-old fireplace in this gorgeous and grand Plus listing. It’s got to be one of the most sumptuous Airbnbs in the city, especially when you factor in the duo of master bedrooms and the opulent walk-in dressing area. The location is fantastic for shopping and sightseeing, what with the bustling Piazza San Carlo just metres outside the door.

Is Airbnb cheaper than hotels in Turin?

You could just be pleasantly surprised at the cost of Airbnbs in Turin. Generally speaking, a self-catering flat or private room booked over the service will come in cheaper than a traditional hotel. What’s more, you can sometimes reduce the cost further by sharing the space with your whole travel crew, making use of extra pull-out beds, or enjoying weekly discounts that can knock chunks off the total.

NH Collection Piazza Carlina

However, don’t come expecting the same level of service as you’d get in a hotel. Airbnbs are more hands-off, private affairs. There will be no breakfast buffet of Italian pastries and fruit waiting in the morning. You won’t have a concierge or daily room cleaning. For all that, you might want to consider something like the NH Collection Piazza Carlina. It’s a gorgeous and well-appointed accommodation run by an international chain, which means you’ll be looked after from check-in to check-out.

Royal and regal Turin is one of the grandest cities in Italy – and that’s saying something! Go in search of a pad there using Airbnb, so you can enjoy the Mole Antonelliana and the famous café culture at whatever pace you choose.

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